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Don’t Rest Your Head

I’m still waiting for my copy to come from lulu, but I’ve also bought the pdf of Don’t Rest Your Head by EvilHat, and I am really really looking forward to try it.

My players are practically all Gaiman fans, so I think they will fit right in the Mat City setting.

Plus, I’ve been reading Actual Play reports, and the game really seems to hum: of all things, for such a light game, one of the spotlights is in the dice rolling mechanic. A single dice roll will tell you who succeded, but also what “colour” the action will have. A player can succed, but Pain (the dice rolled by the GM as opposition) could still dominate. The character would get to do what he/she intended, but it will be painful, in some way or another.

If you want to know more, check out the reviews on rpg.net, like this: they are thorough and clear. Also, read at least an Actual Play report like this, or even listen to it (there are two or three podcast recording of game sessions).

Plus… it’s cheap! 😀

Playing RPGs ofer the net

So, recently me and my gaming buddies are preparing to do some experiments with playing tabletop RPGs over the ‘net. There are actually a number of software tools that are built to facilitate it, some of them are even free (and often opensource).

A pretty common characteristic of these programs is that they are built with very tactical games in mind, the sort that needs miniatures, a battlemap, and lots of minutia such as areas of effect, facing, status of the minis, and so on. For our experiment we will use MapTool, a free java app that features a shared map, chat, dice rollers.

We will be playing Spirit of the Century, instead. The game can be tactical in its own way, but it does not strictly need minis, and so on. What we will really need is a table instead… after all this is a tabletop game!

I’ve set up a “map” with maptool that will work as our shared tabletop: each player will have the “variable” part of his charsheet on it, so that wounds and consequences can be written on them, and a set of chips representing the game’s Fate Points, so that the players can bid them, and see at a glance the points.

You can see the Fate Points virtual chips here:

Fate Point Chip

and a sample setup of the table in my rpg pages.

Checkinstall for gnome packets

Checkinstall is a very useful package for linux distros that track their packages with databases (that is, with rpm or deb packages) when compiling from source, and can save you a lot of headaches when uninstalling or upgrading a package.

But I’ve found a nasty twist (not exactly checkinstall’s fault, actually) that should be kept in mind: there are some files that should NOT belong in your package. And not only for tidyness reasons, but to avoid completely screwing up your Gnome installation.

Read on…

Continue reading “Checkinstall for gnome packets”